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CALL to DUTY

Jim Tagye was in the Vietnam War. He stepped on a land mine and died on the battle field. A medic was able to revive him and they helicoptered him to a hospital . He under went many surgeries and placed in a medical induced coma for one year. They could not remove all of the metal from the mine. He went on to receive his engineering degree . He is now retired and has never experienced a day without pain. As he ages the issues he has intensify. " Jim stated he no longer watches football, "I feel that disrespecting the flag is disrespecting all who have died and those who live with the scars of war"

We honor all who have served for our freedom and continue to do so every day. Sat. Is Veterans Day let us display our flags and bow our heads in gratitude
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"I served with the Army's 318th Infantry Co. M. While in Germany I was wounded. It was a short session of German artillery but was shrapnel flying everywhere. I was hit but I didn't think it was bad and I didn't do anything about it. The next morning we were on the move and I realized I couldn't go on. A medic came back to check me and put me on an ambulance. I was badly infected and spent months in hospitals in France, England and at Fort Dix.

Ed Judge, Mays Landing
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CALL to DUTY

"I was inducted in the Army March 11, 1941. I was a staff Sgt. And a Mess Sgt. I was released on November 17, 1945. I served in the North African and European Theaters of war with the 8th Infantry, the 77th Infantry and the 94th Battery C, 356 Battalion

Arthur F. McLaughlin, Army, Mays Landing
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Call to Duty
"Digging into the past is a very painful thing. It is not modesty that we never talk about the past . It just brings up images that we would rather just leave alone . I went in on Omaha Beach on D- Day Afternoon. The sky was nearly black with Allied bombers. They flew in groups of 35 and you couldn't count the groups. We loaded down ropes to the LCI and I can remember a black soldier packing and re-packing his gear while all the time singing Old Man River over and over to himself. When the front dropped we were in heat high water . I made it to a tank trap and the bravest man I ever saw yelled "Move it" ! He was the Beach Master, I made it to the cliff, under an over hang and thought 'all that training and I'll never make it to the beach! ' I went on to complete five campaigns in Europe furnishing communications for Patton's 4th and 6th Armor Divisions. Best place to be. Behind the spear heads and ahead of the infantry. We got the kisses and the prizes but, not many came home. I should never have made it off the beach at Omaha so every day is a bonus for me.
Robert Linnekin, Army, Mays Landing
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